Church wedding

125-year-old Marion, Iowa church saved from demolition

A Marion Church building devastated by the 2020 derecho will come back to life. The Uptown building originally housed the Marion Methodist Church until they moved to their new facility, KCRG reports. Then, about a year before the derecho, the Greater Cedar Rapids Pentecostal congregation moved in. Since the storm, the church has stood empty. the soul of the community,” said Nick AbouAssaly, Mayor of Marion. Once packed with people from Sunday mornings to weddings, the church has seen better days. This led to the difficulty of finding a buyer who put the demolition on the horizon. It is something that AbouAssaly could “I would have seen as a personal failure as mayor of this city to be honest”, he explained. He pushed more time hoping to find a buyer the property for $98,000 after another buyer dropped in. “What I’m really going to say has me saying, ‘Let’s go and do this,’ is that I would say the mayor has a lot of passion for this building and that has been relayed and obviously he represents the comm unit of Marion,” said Matthew Mulligan, president of Conlon Construction. Brooke Prouty, Main Street program director at Marion, said it suited a community whose motto is “Reach Higher.” “It’s one of the highest points in Marion is the bell tower, and so being able to save that means a lot to our community,” she said. It is not known at this stage what the building will turn into. dreaming up what would be a great addition and then we’re going to get past it,” said Mulligan. A committee of around 10 people will be set up to help generate ideas for the space in the coming months. “You know there are a lot of great ideas of what you can do with a building like this, but none of those ideas mattered until we saved the building first” , said AbouAssaly.

A Marion church building devastated by the derecho of 2020 will come back to life.

The Uptown building originally housed the Marion Methodist Church until they moved to their new facility, KCRG reports. Then, about a year before the derecho, the Greater Cedar Rapids Pentecostal congregation moved in. Since the storm, the church has stood empty.

“If you take away our historic buildings one by one, at some point you lose the soul of the community,” said Nick AbouAssaly, Mayor of Marion.

Once packed with people from Sunday mornings to weddings, the church has seen better days. This led to difficulties in finding a buyer which put demolition on the horizon. This is something that AbouAssaly could not bear.

“I would have seen it as a personal failure as mayor of this city to be honest,” he explained.

He pushed for more time hoping to find a buyer.

Conlon Construction closed the building last week, buying the property for $98,000 after another buyer dropped out.

“What I’m really going to say got me to the point of saying, ‘Let’s go and do this’ is I would say the mayor has a lot of passion for this building and that’s been relayed and obviously he represents the community of Marion,” said Matthew Mulligan, president of Conlon Construction.

Brooke Prouty, director of the Main Street Program at Marion, said it suited a community whose motto is “Reach Higher.”

“It’s one of the highest points in Marion, it’s the bell tower, and so being able to save that means a lot to our community,” she said.

It is not known at this stage what the building will turn into.

“I imagine the next 4 or 5 months is really just dreaming about what would be a great addition and then we’ll deal with it,” Mulligan said.

A committee of around ten people will be set up to help bring out ideas for the space in the months to come.

“You know there are a lot of great ideas of what you can do with a building like this, but none of those ideas mattered until we saved the building first” , said AbouAssaly.

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